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Forest health and fire, a dangerous balance 

Forest health and fire, a dangerous balance 

The task of saving the forest — and places like Payson — keeps getting more complicated. A series of comprehensive studies suggest large-scale restoration logging can play a key role — but not without a dramatic change in the use of fire. However, without such a delicate balance between managing fire and fighting it — the southwest will likely lose most of its pine forests.

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New wood technology may offer hope for struggling timber

John Redfield watches with pride as his son moves a laser-guided precision saw the size of a semi-truck wheel into place over a massive panel of wood. Redfield’s fingers are scarred from a lifetime of cutting wood and now, after decades of decline in the logging business, he has new hope that his son, too, can make a career shaping the timber felled in southern Oregon’s forests.

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Softwood war, beetle battle, loggers laid low

On February 1, the B.C. government signed off on a landmark agreement that ended 20 years of environmental conflict over logging on B.C.’s central coast. Eighty-five per cent of the 6.4 million-hectare Great Bear Rainforest is protected while forest companies have the certainty they need to operate on the remaining 15%. The agreement also brings the region’s indigenous communities into the economy by allocating timber tenures and making them partners in decision-making.

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A lonely tree in Montana inspires travelers along I-15

Teacher Carol Mielke named trees around her town because “some trees are just deserving of names.” Todd was on Maryland Street. Glory and Victoria were twin pines on Fifth Avenue. Hazel was on Delaware. And the tree that meant the most to her she called Noelle.

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WoodWorks leads DOD blast testing project for cross-laminated timber

WoodWorks, in cooperation with the United States Forest Service and the Softwood Lumber Board, conducted a series of live blast tests on three cross-laminated timber (CLT) structures at Tyndall Air Force Base. All structures remained intact and matched modeling predications with acceptable levels of damage under significant explosive loading. WoodWorks will release a full analysis of testing results when available. The results will be used to further expand the use of wood solutions for Department of Defense applications and other blast-resistant construction.

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