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Yes, concrete is pretty much as terrible for the climate as we thought

Yes, concrete is pretty much as terrible for the climate as we thought

The MIT Technology Review publishes a post with the title Cement isn’t as terrible for the climate as we thought. The article notes that making cement pumps out a lot of CO2 through the chemical process of cooking limestone at high temperatures, and then Michael Reilly writes: “But a new study in Nature Geoscience says that once a building is built (and even after it’s been torn down) the mortar, concrete, or rubble soaks back up a fair amount of carbon dioxide through chemical reactions with air and water.

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Japanese co. to build Oregon plant after honing biomass-for-coal process

An Oregon company unveiled technology that could help keep coal-fired power plants running in the United States and around the world – without the coal. The substitute fuel HM3 Energy has in mind is made from biomass, put through a process called torrefaction, which essentially roasts forest waste wood or other organic matter into an energy-dense form that can be dropped into a coal plant with minimal modification.

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Cross-country airline flight powered by logging slash

A project to demonstrate that jets could someday be powered by logging leftovers from Northwest forests got a culminating test. A Boeing 737 is scheduled to take off with fuel tanks filled partly with a wood-based jet fuel. Alaska Airlines fueled a regularly scheduled cross-country flight from Seattle to Washington, DC with a blend of 80 percent regular jet fuel and 20 percent “biojet.”

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Missouri researchers say biomass mix can cut emissions at some coal plants

Burning woody refuse from logging and forest-products manufacturing could, at low cost, help coal-dependent Midwestern power plants meet the carbon-emission reductions mandated in the Clean Power Plan, according to the findings of a pair of researchers from the University of Missouri. Furthermore, the researchers proposed that carbon reductions would be greatest, and the cost lowest, if states shared those resources.

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Converting Oregon coal plant to biomass stokes controversy

Plans to convert a coal-fired power plant in Oregon into what would be the nation’s largest biomass facility will be tested before year’s end when 8,000 tons of toasted wood thinned from a national forest is burned to ensure compatibility with the power plant’s equipment. Portland General Electric is considering whether it can use renewable feed stock to forestall a planned the decommissioning of the Boardman, Ore., plant in 2020 that has been in the works since 2010.

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